Student Support for Online Learning

  • Have you ever...

    • Been online using a phone, tablet, or computer?
    • Read or sent an email or text?
    • Typed a document, developed a slide deck, or created some other thing using an electronic application?
    • Had a conversation with someone via Face Time, Google Hangout, SeeSaw, Skype or some other app?
    • Recorded a video or taken a picture of something using a device of some sort?
    • Shared a picture, document, video, website link, or anything else with someone using a technology tool?
    • Watched a video or movie using a device?
    • Learned anything or shared what you learned about something when doing any of the above activities?
    • Used a technology device in any way and learned something from it?

    If you can answer "Yes" to any one of the above questions, then chances are you have engaged in online learning -- especially if you created something that you shared with another person.  The learning you did just wasn't designed and implemented by one of your current teachers or another educator.

    Now, there are plenty of reasons blended or virtual learning might happen in Anchorage  Here are examples of just a few reasons:

    • Suppose a school building has to close for a while because of snow or some kind of problem that makes the school building uninhabitable (think: loss of electricity, no water, and so on), and there's no interest in extending the school year for the students in that school.
    • Suppose  a student has a medical condition that makes it hard for them to be in school , and they're really interested in and capable of keeping up with classwork.
    • Suppose a student is interested in pursuing post-secondary education (and we certainly hope most students are!).  Most colleges and career preparation programs include online learning components.  Therefore, developing student expertise in online learning now prepares everyone for their future success in career, college, and life!

    Educators in Anchorage are starting to think about ways to help kids participate in learning beyond the classroom, in the cloud.  Students will have the chance to show what they know virtually. Imagine the possibilities!

  • Following "Netiquette"

  • Establish your Learning Routine and Learning Space

  • Being an Active Learner and Advocating for your Learning Needs

Parent/Guardian Support

  • Online learning may be challenging for some families. Parents will need to think differently about how to support their children, create structures and routines that allow their children to be successful, and how to monitor and support their children’s learning. The best practices provided below are intended to assist parents in helping their children find success in an online learning environment.

  • Establish routines and expectations

  • Define the physical space for your student’s school work

  • Begin and end each day with a check-in

  • Take an active role in helping your student

  • Establish times for quiet and reflection

  • Encourage physical activity and/or exercise

  • Monitor how much time your child is spending online

  • Maintain an appropriate level of decorum in your home

Last Modified on Wednesday at 9:38 AM