Definition of Common Terms

  • FERPA 

    The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) protects the confidentiality of student information.

    FERPA protects the personally identifiable information of students, meaning no student ID numbers, no student names, and no personal contact information will be available.

    We also cannot provide data for extremely small sample sizes if it risks exposing the privacy of our students. 

     

    U.S. Department of Education FERPA site for researchers

     

    Student personal identifiable information:

    • The student’s name
    • The name of the student’s parent or other family members
    • The address of the student or students’ family
    • A personal identifier, such as the student’s social security number or student number
    • A list of personal characteristics that would make the student’s identity easily traceable
  • PPRA  

    The Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA) protects student and parental information in the following eight areas: 

    • Income
    • Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parents
    • Mental or psychological problems of the student or the student’s family
    • Sex behavior or attitudes
    • Illegal, antisocial, self-incriminating, or demeaning behavior
    • Critical appraisals of other individuals with whom respondents have close family relationships
    • Legally recognized privileged or analogous relationships, such as those of lawyers, physicians, and ministers
    • Religious practices, affiliations, or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent 

     

    Any survey or research that gathers/uses student data on these protected areas must have prior written parental consent. 

    For anonymous surveys that require permission, the school board policy requires that a notice must be provided to parents at least two weeks (via newsletter, website or and/or other method of communication) prior to the survey/research administration with an opportunity for parents to opt out.

     

    U.S. Department of Education PPRA site